Understanding Flash: Garbage Collection Matters

garbage-collection

In the last post in this series I discussed some of the various tasks that need to be performed by the flash translation layer – the layer of abstraction that sits between us and the raw NAND flash on which we desire to store our data. One of those tasks is the infamous garbage collection process (or “GC”) – and in these next couple of posts I’m going to look into GC a little deeper.

But first, let’s consider what would happen on a flash system if there were no GC at all.

Why We Need Garbage Collection

Let’s imagine a very simple flash system comprising of just five blocks, each with just ten pages. In the beginning, all the pages are empty, so we can say that 100% of the capacity is Free:

garbage-collection-fill1

 

There’s no point in wasting all that lovely flash, so I’m going to write some data to it. Remember that a write operation in the world of flash is known as a program operation and it takes place at the page level. So here goes:

garbage-collection-fill2

 

You can see a couple of things happening here. First of all, some of the capacity is now showing as Used. Secondly, you can see that our wear levelling algorithm has kicked in to spread the data over all the blocks fairly evenly. Some blocks have more used pages than others, but the wear levelling doesn’t have to be exact, just approximate. Let’s add some more data:

garbage-collection-fill3

 

Now we’re at 50% Used – and again the data has been spread evenly for the purposes of wear levelling. The flash translation later is also taking care of logical to physical block mapping, so although data has been spread across multiple blocks it has the appearance of being sequential when accessed by the calling application.

Time For Some Updates

So far so good. But at some point we’re probably going to want to update some of the existing data. And as we know, on NAND flash that’s not straightforward because used pages cannot be updated without the entire block first being erased. So for now we simply write the updated data to an empty page and mark the old page as stale. The logical to physical block mapping allows us to simply redirect the logical address of an updated block to the physical address of the new page:

garbage-collection-fill4

See how some of the blocks which were showing as Used (in red) are now showing as Stale (in yellow)? And of course the capacity graph is now showing a percentage of the total capacity as being stale. But have you also noticed that we are approaching the point where we can never free up the stale pages?

Never forget that NAND flash can only be erased at the block level. In the above example, the first (left-most) block has two stale pages and four used pages. In order to free up those stale pages I need to copy the used pages somewhere else and then erase the block. If I don’t do that very soon, I’m going to run out of free pages in the other blocks and then … I’m screwed:

garbage-collection-fill5

This situation is a disaster, because at this point I can never free up the stale blocks, which means I’ve effectively just turned my flash system into a read only device. And yet if you look at the capacity graph, it’s only around 75% full of real data (the stuff in red). So does this mean I can never use 100% of a flash device?

The Return of Over-Provisioning

Earlier in this Storage for DBAs blog series I wrote an article about one of my least favourite practices in the world of hard disk drives: over-provisioning. I now have to own up and confess that in the world of flash we do pretty much the same thing, although for slightly different reasons (and without the massive overhead of power, cooling and real-estate costs that makes me so mad with disk).

To ensure that there is always enough room for garbage collection to continue (as well as to allow for things like bad blocks, wear levelling etc), pretty much every flash device vendor (from SSDs through to All Flash Arrays) uses the same trick:

garbage-collection-overprovision

Yep, there’s more flash in your device than you can actually see. For example, rip off the covers of a 400GB HGST Ultrastar SSD800MM (the SSD that used to be found in XtremIO arrays) and you’ll find 576GB of raw flash. There’s 44% more capacity on the device than it advertises when you access it. This extra area is not pinned by the way, it’s not a dedicated set of blocks or pages. It’s just mandatory headroom that stops situations like the one we described above ever occurring.

The Violin Way

Violin Intelligent Memory Module (VIMM)Since I work for Violin Memory it would be remiss of me not to discuss the concept of format levels at this point. When you buy flash in the form of SSDs, or flash arrays that contain SSDs, the amount of over-provisioning is generally fixed. Almost all SSDs have a predefined over-provision area and that cannot be changed (if there is an SSD on the market that allows this, I am not aware of it).

One of the advantages we have at Violin is that we build our arrays from the ground up using NAND flash chips rather than pre-packaged SSDs – our flash is located on our unique Violin Intelligent Memory Modules (VIMMs). This means we have control down to the NAND flash level – and one of the benefits here is that we can choose how much over-provisioning is required based on workload. At Violin we call this the format level of an array and we allow customers to set it when they take delivery (it can also be changed at a later time but obviously requires a reformat of the array).

I see this as a great benefit because some workloads are very read-intensive and so a large over-provision would essentially be a waste of good flash. Conversely some workloads are so write-heavy that the hard limits found on an SSD device would not be suitable. trashcanIn general I believe that choice (as long as it comes with advice) is a good thing.

In the next post we’ll look at garbage collection some more, in particular the concept of background versus foreground garbage collection, as well as cover the infamous write cliff. But for now, just remember: no matter what form of flash you are using, in order for it to work and perform properly, something somewhere has to take out the trash…

Understanding Flash: The Flash Translation Layer

electronics

A couple of posts ago in this series, I explained how a NAND flash die is comprised of planes, which contain blocks, which contain pages… which contain individual cells of data. Read operations take place at the page level, as do write operations (although we call them program operations in the flash world). But crucially, erase operations take place at the block level and so affect multiple pages.

Erases are also slow (at least relative to reads and writes) and cause wear of the flash media, gradually moving it closer to its end of life. It’s therefore the case that when you want to update an existing page of data it is faster, simpler and less damaging to simply write the updated information to an empty page. If you’re going to do that, you will probably also want to choose a new page somewhere completely different from the old one to ensure that your flash wears out evenly. And hey, don’t forget that the block containing the old page will need to be erased at some point before it can be reused.

flash-translation-layer-burgerSo to make flash a friendly medium for storing our data, we need a mechanism which will:

  1. write updated information to a new empty page and then divert all subsequent read requests to its new address
  2. ensure that newly-programmed pages are evenly distributed across all of the available flash so that it wears evenly
  3. keep a list of all the old invalid pages so that at some point later on they can all be recycled ready for reuse

This mechanism is called the flash translation layer (FTL) and you will find it on all flash media if you look hard enough. The FTL has a number of responsibilities, so let’s look at them now.

Logical Block Mapping

Abstraction is everywhere in computing. The URL of this website is a logical address which maps to a physical address, i.e. the IP address. An IP address is in fact a logical address which maps to a physical address, i.e. the MAC address of a network interface. There are so many examples of abstraction in technology that sometimes I think the whole world of computing is just one massive layer of abstraction.

logical-physical-block-addressingIn storage, the idea of a logical block address (LBA) has been around since long before NAND flash and is primarily used to make addressing simpler and more flexible. Like all abstraction concepts it exists to make the (potentially complex) management of a low level system invisible to the higher levels that consume its services. For example, if a hard drive within a RAID group fails and the data it contained has to be rebuilt on a hot spare, the physical block address of certain blocks of data will change. To avoid the need to notify all possible interested parties (e.g applications, databases, etc) of the new address, the extra layer of logical block addressing is used; the map from LBA to PBA is amended and nobody else needs to know.

In a flash system this same mechanism can be used for updates, so that when a page is considered invalid the logical block address can be remapped to the newly-programmed page. This provides the solution to number 1 in our list above in a way that is both simple and transparent to anyone issuing I/O requests.

Wear Levelling

On the face of it, wear levelling seems like a fairly simple method of handling number 2 in our list. You have a predefined number of flash blocks, each of which can be programmed and erased (known as the P/E cycle) a similar number of times before they are no longer usable. Clearly the object of any wear levelling algorithm is to smoothly distribute all P/E cycles so that the blocks all reach their limit at the same time. flash-remaining-lifetimeWithout wear levelling it’s entirely possible that a subset of blocks could receive the majority of P/E cycles and thus wear out very quickly, reducing the available capacity of the system.

If all blocks in a system were regularly updated this would be no problem, because wear levelling would happen almost naturally as pages are marked invalid and then recycled. But here’s the problem: if we have some cold blocks, i.e. locations where the data never changes, then we have to take steps to manually relocate that data otherwise those blocks won’t ever wear… and that means we are actually adding write workload to the system, which ultimately means increasing the wear.

So to put it in simple terms, the more aggressive we are about wear levelling evenly, the more wear we cause. But not being aggressive enough could result in hot and cold spots as wear becomes more uneven. As always, it’s a question of finding the right balance. Or, if you prefer, finding the write balance.*

Garbage Collection

The third requirement in our list is a way of recycling pages that are no longer required (i.e. invalid) but have not yet been erased. Of course you cannot simply erase them at your leisure, because flash requires the entire containing block to be erased too. So instead it’s necessary to consider the remaining contents of the block and – if necessary – transparently move some active data elsewhere.recycling-bins Once the block has no remaining active data in it, it can be erased and then becomes ready to use again.

The thing is, the block in question might have 128 or 256 pages in it, many of which contain active data. You might have to go to a lot of effort in order to recycle just a small number of invalid pages – and just like with wear levelling, the act of moving data around in the background will have consequences to things like performance and endurance. Again it’s a question of finding the right balance.

Garbage Collection is such an important part of the management of flash that I’m going to devote a whole post to it next in the series. But for now, consider this: what happens if you fill up your trash faster than it gets taken away? You run out of space in your bins and everything starts to smell pretty bad. We definitely need to make sure that doesn’t happen here…

Write Amplification

Now you might have noticed that a lot of the processes described here result in additional operations taking place on the flash media. Wear Levelling can relocate inactive (cold) pages in order to ensure they wear evenly in comparison to active (hot) pages. Garbage Collection can result in pages being moved from a block which will subsequently be erased. In short, stuff is happening in the background as a consequence of the actions taking place on the host – which we will call the foreground in order to distinguish it. What’s more, if you are looking at things from the point of view of the foreground – like, for example, a database server accessing flash storage – you have no visibility of what’s going on in the background.

It doesn’t matter what OS monitoring tools you run on the host (iostat, for example, or dstat), you will only see the foreground I/O operations that the host knows about. This is important because the performance and endurance of your flash storage is dependent on the sum of foreground and background operations.

We call this phenomena write amplification and we can express it as a value using the following formula:

Write Amplification = Data Written To Flash / Data Written By The Host

A higher value indicates an increased workload on the flash storage system, which is likely to mean reduced endurance and performance. For this reason, if you are testing any sort of flash system (from the mighty All Flash Array to a simple SSD) you should make every effort to observe the workload within the storage system as well as from the host. Of course with the humble SSD that’s often not possible…

Where Is Your FTL?

cautionAs a final thought, earlier on I said about the FTL that “you will find it on all flash media if you look hard enough“. What did I mean? Well, the FTL has a lot of duties to perform, as we’ve seen. That requires effort, which for a computer equates to processing power and memory. In most situations (e.g. All Flash Arrays) this happens in firmware under the covers. But with some products, for example certain PCIe flash cards, it’s possible that some or all of the FTL functionality runs on the host, using host CPU cycles and DRAM.

In principle there may be benefits and drawbacks of either method (host-based FTL or array-based FTL), but if you are running a database on your server they become insignificant in relation to the cost. After all, those processors in your database servers? The ones that affect your core-based licenses for Oracle or other database software? They are the most expensive CPUs you own. If you are donating CPU cycles from these cores to manage your flash, you are effectively throwing away license money. And you probably feel you pay enough to your database vendor already, right?

* Seriously, if you didn’t think that was a great pun then you’re reading the wrong blog.

Oracle, Parallelism and Direct Path Reads… on Flash

3000-open-case

Guest Post

This is another guest post from my buddy Nate Fuzi, who performs the same role as me for Violin but is based in the US instead of EMEA. Because he’s an American, Nate believes that “football” is played using your hands and that the ball is actually egg-shaped. This is of course ridiculous, because as the entire rest of the world knows, this is football whereas the game Nate is thinking of is actually called “HandEgg”. Now that we’ve cleared that up, over to you, Nate:

Lately, I’ve been running into much confusion around Oracle’s direct path IO functionality (11g+) and, unusually, not all of that confusion is my own. There is a perplexing lack of literature and experimentation with direct path IO on the Internet today. Seriously, I’ve looked. I decided I needed to better understand this event and its timing in order to properly extend suggestions to customers. I set about trying to prove some things I thought I knew, and I managed to confirm several suspicions but also surprised myself with some unexpected results. I’d like to share these in hopes of clarifying this event for everyone in practical terms.

Direct Path IO Background

To set the stage a bit, at the highest level, Oracle created the direct path IO event to describe an IO executed by an Oracle process that reads into (or writes from) the process global area (think of this as the session’s private memory) directly from (to) storage, bypassing the Oracle buffer cache. The rationale is this: full table scans of large tables into the buffer cache consume a lot of space, pushing out likely useful buffers in favor of buffers unlikely to be needed again in the near future. Reading directly into the process global area instead of the shared global area keeps full table scans from polluting the buffer cache and diminishing its overall effectiveness. Since the direct path IO is used for full scanning large objects, it looks to the database’s DB_FILE_MULTIBLOCK_READ_COUNT (henceforth referred to as DBMRC) setting for guidance on the size of IO calls to issue.

Makes sense. But what’s been confusing me is the apparently inconsistent performance of direct path reads and writes, even against Violin’s all-flash arrays. With random and other multi-block IO events showing very low, consistent performance, direct path reads can still be all over the board. How is that? Is it truly impacting performance? How can I make it better, or should I even try? After seeing this at a number of customer installations, I decided to run some tests on a smallish lab server attached to a single Violin array.

The Setup

I have a test database with a number of tables almost exactly 125GB in size full of randomized data. Full-scanning one of these tables via “select count(*)” was plenty to exercise the direct path read repeatedly, varying parallelism and DBMRC. My goal was to see the effect of these settings on both elapsed time and perceived latency. With an 8K database block size (RHEL 6.3, Oracle 12.1.0.1, ASM), I ran the test with DBMRC set to 4, then 8, 16, and finally 128. I ran each test with no parallelism, then with “parallel 16” hinted. So what did I see?

Test Results

direct-path-read-testing

Note that elapsed times represent the time my query returned to the SQL*Plus prompt with the “set timing on” directive applied to my session and are not 100% representative of time spent on the database but are close enough for my purposes. Total direct path read (DPR) time was pulled from the respective AWR report after execution finished. I asterisked the Physical Read Requests column because some of the reports showed 0 physical reads for the test SQL, while it was clear from the total physical reads that my read operation was the only possible culprit; therefore I felt justified in attributing that total (minus a few here and there from the AWR snapshotting process) to the test SQL. Note also that the best elapsed time was achieved with the lowest DBMRC and parallel 16. Worst time by far was also obtained with DBMRC set to 4 but without parallelism—although it accumulated the least amount of wait time on DPR. In general, throwing more cores at the problem improved performance hugely; not surprising, but noteworthy. We know that flash does not benefit from multi-block IO as a rule: at the lowest level, every IO is effectively a random IO, and larger blocks / groups of blocks are fetched independently, assembled, and returned to the caller as a single unit. However, there is a definite overhead in issuing IO requests, waiting for the calls to return, and consuming the requested data. This is evidenced by the high elapsed time for the single-threaded run with DBMRC set to 4: the least amount of reported IO wait time still contributed to the longest overall elapsed time.

So what do these values tell us? For one thing, parallelism is your friend. One core performing a FTS just isn’t going to get the job done nearly as quickly as multiple cores. Also, parallelism vastly trumps DBMRC as a tool for improving performance on flash when CPU resources are available. Performance between parallel processing runs was within 2%, no matter what the DBMRC setting. This I expected, having come into the testing with the assumption that DBMRC was irrelevant when working with flash. I was surprised at the exceedingly high elapsed time with the single-threaded query using small DBMRC. I would expect that to be higher than the others, but not nearly 3X longer than the single-threaded run with DBMRC at 128.

These revelations are mildly interesting, but what I find much more curious is the difference in reported DPR latency. Certainly, a highly parallel execution can accumulate more database time than wall clock time for any event. But we can tell from the elapsed times that, when we’re not starving the database for parallelism, DBMRC is practically meaningless when applied to flash. Yet the calculation of the average latency of the event is mysterious in that 1) 16 threads operating with DBMRC of 128 experiences roughly 4X the number of waits the single-threaded execution performs; 2) it does so apparently at about 13X the average latency of the single-threaded run; and 3) it racks up about 51X the amount of total DPR wait time.

What’s worse is that DPR stats are very strangely represented in the Tablespace IO stats section of the report. Here’s the snippet from test run #2:

                     Av       Av     Av      1-bk  Av 1-bk          Writes   Buffer  Av Buf
Tablespace   Reads   Rds/s  Rd(ms) Blks/Rd   Rds/s  Rd(ms)  Writes   avg/s    Waits  Wt(ms)
---------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- -------- -------
DEMO       4.1E+06  49,395     0.0     4.0       2     0.0       0       0        0     0.0

We have to cut Oracle some slack on the Av Rds/s value here because it’s now averaging over the time it took me to start the test after my initial snapshot, then realize the test was done and execute another AWR snapshot to end the reporting period. Fine. But an average read time of 0.0ms?! Clearly, Oracle is recording some number of reads, but it’s not reporting timing on them at all in this section of the report. We have to look to the SQL Ordered by Physical Reads (Unoptimized) section of the report to confirm it’s actually doing a relevant number of IO requests:

-> Total Physical Read Requests:       4,092,389
-> Captured SQL account for    0.0% of Total
-> Total UnOptimized Read Requests:       4,092,389
-> Captured SQL account for    0.0% of Total
-> Total Optimized Read Requests:               1
-> Captured SQL account for    0.0% of Total
 
[some lines removed]
 
UnOptimized   Physical              UnOptimized
  Read Reqs   Read Reqs Executions Reqs per Exe   %Opt %Total    SQL Id
----------- ----------- ---------- ------------ ------ ------ -------------
          0           0          1          0.0    N/A    0.0 4kpvpt49hm3nf
Module: SQL*Plus
   PDB: DEMO
select /*+ parallel 16 */ count(*) from demo.length100_1

Oh, wait.  Oracle doesn’t credit my query with any physical read requests.  I have to look at the total just above in the report, and see that only the AWR snapshot performed any other IO on the system, and subtract that from the total.  Sigh.  At least ~4.1M reads at 32KB comes close to 125GB.

So what gives, Oracle?  I’ve read some Oracle notes and other blogs on the subject of DPR, and they suggest the wait event is not necessarily triggered when the IO call is initially issued, but instead when the session decides it needs all outstanding DPR IOs it has issued to complete before moving on—or it fills up all its “slots” and has to wait for those to free up.  Thus the under-reporting of the actual number of DPR waits and the artificially high wait time for each of those waits:  fewer waits, along with potentially many IO requests outstanding when the wait is triggered and timing starts.  But nowhere in all of this is there a set of numbers that I can trust to accurately describe my DPR performance.  The fact that DPR IO is completely left out of tablespace timings is seriously troubling:  we trust these stats to determine “hot” tablespaces and under-performing mount points.  This throws all kinds of doubt into the mix.

What can I say about Oracle’s DPR at this point?  While it works just fine and serves its purpose, the instrumentation appears to be lacking, even in Oracle 12.1.  After this testing, I feel even more confident telling customers to ignore the latency reported for this event—at least for now.  And I’ve confirmed my belief that, with any sort of parallelism enabled on your database, DBMRC is largely irrelevant for flash storage and only adds a mystery factor to reported latencies.  Yes, setting this to a low value will affect costing of FTS vs. index access, so you should verify that plans currently employing FTS that you want to remain that way still do.  This is easy enough with an alter session and explain plan.  With that, Oracle, the ball is in your court:  please define your terms, fix your instrumentation around DPR, or tell customers to stop worrying about DPR latencies.  Meanwhile, I’m going to advise people who are otherwise happy with their performance but want better latency numbers in their reports to set DBMRC lower and get on with their lives.

New section: Oracle SLOB Testing

slob ghost

For some time now I have preferred Oracle SLOB as my tool for generating I/O workloads using Oracle databases. I’ve previously blogged some information on how to use SLOB for PIO testing, as well as shared some scripts for running tests and extracting results. I’ve now added a whole new landing page for SLOB and a complete guide to running sustained throughput testing.

Why would you want to run sustained throughput tests? Well, one great reason is that not all storage platforms can cope with sustained levels of write workload. Flash arrays, or any storage array which contains flash, have a tendency to suffer from garbage collection issues when sustained write workloads hit them hard enough.

Find out more by following the links below:

Understanding Flash: SLC, MLC and TLC

slc-mlc-tlc-fruitmachine

The last post in this series discussed the layout of NAND flash memory chips and the way in which cells can be read and written (programmed) at the page level but have to be erased at the (larger) block level. I finished by mentioning that erase operations take substantially longer than read or program operations… but just how big is the difference?

Knowing the answer to this involves first understanding the different types of flash memory available: SLC, MLC and TLC.

Electrons In A Bucket?

Whenever I’ve seen anyone attempt to explain this in the past, they have almost always resorted to drawing a picture of electrons or charge filling up a bucket. This is a terrible analogy and causes anyone with a deep understanding of physics to cringe in horror. Luckily, I don’t have a deep understanding of physics, so I’m going to go right along with the herd and get my bucket out.

A NAND flash cell, i.e. the thing that stores a value of one or zero, is actually a floating gate transistor. Programming the cell means putting electrons into the floating gate, causing it to become (negatively) charged. Erasing the cell means removing the electrons from the floating gate, draining the charge. The amount of charge contained in the floating gate can be varied from zero up to a maximum value – this is an analogue system so there is no simple FULL or EMPTY state.

Because of this, the amount of charge can be measured and thresholds assigned to indicate a binary value. What does that mean? It means that, in the case of Single Level Cell (SLC) flash anything below 50% of charge can be considered to be a bit with a value of 1, while anything above 50% can be considered a bit with a value of 0.

But if i decided to be a bit more careful in the way I fill or empty my bucket of charge (sorry), I could perhaps define more thresholds and thus hold two bits of data instead of one. I could say that below 25% is 11, from 25% to 50% is 10, from 50% to 75% is 01 and above 75% is 00. Now I can keep twice as much data in the same bucket. This is in fact Multi Level Cell (MLC). And as the picture shows, if I was really careful in the way I treated my bucket, I could even keep three bits of data in there, which is what happens in Three Level Cell (TLC):

slc-mlc-tlc-buckets

The thing is, imagine this was a bucket of water (comparing electrons to water is probably the last straw for anyone reading this who has a degree in physics, so I bid you farewell at this point). If you were to fill up your bucket using the SLC method, you could be pretty slap-dash about it. I mean it’s pretty obvious when the bucket is more than half full or empty. But if you were using a more fine-grained method such as MLC or TLC you would need to fill / empty very carefully and take exact measurements, which means the act of filling (programming) would be a lot slower.

To really stretch this analogy to breaking point, imagine that every time you fill your bucket it gets slightly damaged, causing it to leak. In the SLC world, even a number of small leaks would not be a big deal. But in the MLC or (especially) the TLC world, those leaks mean it would quickly become impossible to keep using your bucket, because the tolerance between different bit values is so small. For similar reasons, NAND flash endurance is greatly influenced by the type of cell used. Storing more bits per cell means a lower tolerance for errors, which in turn means that higher error rates are experienced and endurance (the number of program/erase cycles that can be sustained) is lower.

Timing and Wear

Enough of the analogies, let’s look at some proper data. The chart below uses sample figures from AnandTech:

slc-mlc-tlc-performance-chart

You can see that as the number of bits per cell increases, so does the time taken to perform read, program (i.e. write) and erase operations. Erases in particular are especially slow, with values measured in milliseconds instead of microseconds. Given that erases also affect larger areas of flash than reads and programs, you can start to see why the management of erase operations on flash is critical to performance.

Also apparent on the chart above is the massive difference in the number of program / erase cycles between the different flash types: for SLC we’re talking about orders of magnitude in difference. But of course SLC can only store one bit per cell, which means it’s much more expensive from a capacity perspective than MLC. TLC, meanwhile, offers the potential for great value for money, but none of the performance requirements you would need for tier one storage (although it may well have a place in the world of backups). It is for this reason that MLC is the most commonly used type of flash in enterprise storage systems. (By the way I’m so utterly disinterested in the phenomena of “eMLC” that I’m not going to cover it here, but you can read this and this if you want to know more on the subject…)

Warning: Know Your Flash

cautionOne final thing. When you buy an SSD, a PCIe flash card or, in the case of Violin Memory, an all-flash array you tend to choose between SLC and MLC. As a very rough rule of thumb you can consider MLC to be twice the capacity for half the performance of SLC, although this in fact varies depending on many factors. However there are some all flash array vendors who use both SLC and MLC in a sort of tiered approach. That’s fine -and if you are buying a flash array I’m sure you’ll take the time to understand how it works.

But here’s the thing. At least one of these vendors insists on describing the SLC layer as “NVRAM” to differentiate from the MLC layer which it simply describes as using flash SSDs. The truth is that the NVRAM is also just a bunch of flash SSDs, except they are SLC instead of MLC. I’m not in favour of using educational posts to criticise competitors, but in the interest of bring clarity to this subject I will say this: I think this is a marketing exercise which deliberately adds confusion to try and make the design sound more exciting. “Ooooh, NVRAM that sounds like something I ought to have in my flash array…” – or am I being too cynical?

Understanding Flash: Blocks, Pages and Program / Erases

In the last post on this subject I described the invention of NAND flash and the way in which erase operations affect larger areas than write operations. Let’s have a look at this in more detail and see what actually happens. First of all, we need to know our way around the different entities on a flash chip (or “package“), which are: the die, the plane, the block and the page:

NAND Flash Die Layout (image courtesy of AnandTech)

NAND Flash Die Layout (image courtesy of AnandTech)

Note: What follows is a high-level description of the generic behaviour of flash. There are thousands of different NAND chips available, each potentially with slightly different instruction sets, block/page sizes, performance characteristics etc.

  • The package is the memory chip, i.e. the black rectangle with little electrical connectors sticking out of it. If you look at an SSD, a flash card or the internals of a flash array you will see many flash packages, each of which is produced by one of the big flash manufacturers: Toshiba, Samsung, Micron, Intel, SanDisk, SK Hynix. These are the only companies with the multi-billion dollar fabrication plants necessary to make NAND flash.
  • Each package contains one or more dies (for example one, two, or four). The die is the smallest unit that can independently execute commands or report status.
  • Each die contains one or more planes (usually one or two). Identical, concurrent operations can take place on each plane, although with some restrictions.
  • Each plane contains a number of blocks, which are the smallest unit that can be erased. Remember that, it’s really important.
  • Each block contains a number of pages, which are the smallest unit that can be programmed (i.e. written to).

The important bit here is that program operations (i.e. writes) take place to a page, which might typically be 8-16KB in size, while erase operations take place to a block, which might be 4-8MB in size. Since a block needs to be erased before it can be programmed again (*sort of, I’m generalising to make this easier), all of the pages in a block need to be candidates for erasure before this can happen.

Program / Erase Cycles

When your flash device arrives fresh from the vendor, all of the pages are “empty”. The first thing you will want to do, I’m sure, is write some data to them – which in the world of memory chips we call a program operation. As discussed, these program operations take place at the page level. You can then read your fresh data back out again with read operations, which also take place at the page level. [Having said that, the instruction to read a page places the data from that page in a memory register, so your reading process can in fact then selectively access subsets of the page if it desires - but maybe that's going into too much detail...]

NAND-flash-blocks-pages-program-erasesWhere it gets interesting is if you want to update the data you just wrote. There is no update operation for flash, no undo or rewind mechanism for changing what is currently in place, just the erase operation. It’s a little bit like an etch-a-sketch, in that you can continue to turn the dials and make white sections of screen go black, but you cannot turn black sections of screen to white again with erasing the entire screen. Etch-a-SketchAn erase operation on a flash chip clears the data from all pages in the block, so if some of the other pages contain active data (stuff you want to keep) you either have to copy it elsewhere first or hold off from doing the erase.

In fact, that second option (don’t erase just yet) makes the most sense, because the blocks on a flash chip can only tolerate a limited number of program and erase options (known as the program erase cycle or PE cycle because for obvious reasons they follow each other in turn). If you were to erase the block every time you wanted to change the contents of a page, your flash would wear out very quickly.

So a far better alternative is to simply mark the old page (containing the unchanged data) as INVALID and then write the new, changed data to an empty page. All that is required now is a mechanism for pointing any subsequent access operations to the new page and a way of tracking invalid pages so that, at some point, they can be “recycled”.

NAND-flash-page-update

Updating a page in NAND flash. Note that the new page location does not need to be within the same block, or even the same flash die. It is shown in the same block here purely for ease of drawing.

This “mechanism” is known as the flash translation layer and it has responsibility for these tasks as well as a number of others. We’ll come back to it in subsequent posts because it is a real differentiator between flash products. For now though, think about the way the device is filling up with data. Although we’ve delayed issuing erase operations by cleverly moving data to different pages, at some point clearly there will be no empty pages left and erases will become essential. This is where the bad news comes in: it takes many times longer to perform an erase than it does to perform a read or program. And that clearly has consequences for performance if not managed correctly.

In the next post we’ll look at the differences in time taken to perform reads, programs and erases – which first requires looking at the different types of flash available: SLC, MLC and TLC…

caution[* Technical note: Ok so actually when a NAND flash page is empty it is all binary ones, e.g. 11111111. A program operation sets any bit with the value of 1 to 0, so for example 11111111 could become 11110000. This means that later on it is still possible to perform another program operation to set 11110000 to 00110000 for example. Until all bits are zero it's technical possible to perform another program. But hey, that's getting a bit too deep into the details for our requirements here, so just pretend you never read this...]

New My Oracle Support note on Advanced Format (4k) storage

advanced-format-logo

In the past I have been a little critical of Oracle’s support notes and documentation regarding the use of Advanced Format 4k storage devices. I must now take that back, as my new friends in Oracle ASM Development and Product Management very kindly offered to let me write a new support note, which they have just published on My Oracle Support. It’s only supposed to be high level, but it does confirm that the _DISK_SECTOR_SIZE_OVERRIDE parameter can be safely set in database instances when using 512e storage and attempting to create 4k online redo logs.

The new support note is:

Using 4k Redo Logs on Flash and SSD-based Storage (Doc ID 1681266.1)

Don’t forget that you can read all about the basics of using Oracle with 4k sector storage here. And if you really feel up to it, I have a 4k deep dive page here.

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